Rubella or German Measles


Red rashes can be seen when human is suffering from Rubella. Small children are common to be infected. (Image courtesy: Rubella UK)
Red rashes can be seen when human is suffering from Rubella. Small children are common to be infected. (Image courtesy: Rubella UK)

Rubella or the German measles is a common disease that affects the skin, making red rashes appear all over the body. Despite the alternative name of German measles, it is not caused by the same virus which causes measles. Currently, Hong Kong provides MMR vaccinations (measles , mumps, rubella) for children at the age of one. But despite the compulsory vaccinations, according to the Centre of Health Protection, in just 2009 there were 44 reported cases of rubella in Hong Kong.

The Cause


(Image courtesy: Public Health Wales)
(Image courtesy: Public Health Wales)
As said above, the rubella virus causes rubella (shown on the left). The virus is likely to enter the human body through the mouth and the nose. It is not a severe disease for infants, but it can cause great danger to the foetus, such as blindness and deafness, if the pregnant woman is infected by the rubella virus.


The Symptoms

The symptoms of rubella is quite visible. Red rash, fever, dry skin, eye inflammation, and pain in testicles (only applies to males) are few of the symptoms of rubella. None of the symptoms are deadly or serious.

The Cure


Currently, there is no direct cure for rubella, though separate cures for the symptoms are available, such as panadol to relieve fever. Common medicine can be bought in clinics and hospital for a cheap price.

Further Information


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References


  1. National Public Health Service for Wales (NPHS) - Rubella (German measles). (2009, January 22). NHS Wales - Health of Wales Information Service (HOWIS). Retrieved March 23, 2010, from http://www.wales.nhs.uk/sites3/page.cfm?orgid=719&pid=23313
  2. Rubella - NHS Choices information about rubella.. (2009, November 20). NHS Choices Homepage - Your health, your choices. Retrieved March 23, 2010, from http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Rubella/Pages/Introduction.asp
  3. Number of notifications for notifiable infectious diseases in 2009. (n.d.). Centre for Health Protection. Retrieved March 25, 2010, from http://www.chp.gov.hk/en/data/1/10/26/43/375.html